Discover the 5 Most Dangerous Neighborhoods in Williams County, North Dakota

Williams County is located in North Dakota’s northwest region. It covers 2,077 square miles and has a population of about 37,000 people. Williston, the sixth-largest city in North Dakota and a major hub for oil and gas, is located in the county.

In spite of this economic importance, Williams County faces high rates of crime, especially in certain of its areas. Based on data on crime, housing quality, and community reputation, we will look at Williams County’s five most vulnerable neighborhoods in this post.

Williston

Williston, the main city and county seat, is home to over 27,000 people, with a median household income of about $88,000. Williston is notable for its booming oil and gas industry. It is located close to the border between North Dakota and Montana and about one hour south of the Canadian border.

However, it struggles with a high crime rate and poor standard of living. Williston has a violent crime rate of 1086 per 1000 residents, which is 96% higher than the national average.

In Williston, there is a 1 in 7 chance of becoming a victim of crime, which includes crimes like robbery, theft, rape, assault, and murder. In addition, the city’s livability is impacted by problems including noise pollution, homelessness, transportation congestion, and environmental challenges.

Epping

There are about 200 people living in Epping, a little village in the center of Williams County, with a median household income of about $54,000. Situated next to the Little Muddy River and along Highway 2, Epping has a startlingly high violent crime rate of 2910 per 1000 population, which is 303% higher than the national average.

In Epping, the probability of becoming a victim of a crime such as murder, rape, assault, robbery, or arson is 1 in 5. This negative reputation is exacerbated by the town’s poverty, overcrowding, poor sanitation, and limited services.

Ray

There are about 800 people living in Ray, a small city in eastern Williams County, with a median household income of about $66,000. Ray, which is near the White Earth River and on Highway 2, faces a violent crime rate of 2143 per 1000 population, which is 197% higher than the national average.

In Ray, there is a 1 in 8 chance of becoming a victim of crime, which includes crimes like robbery, burglary, assault, rape, and murder. Ray also faces issues including gang activity, unemployment, poverty, and racial tensions, which add to the area’s reputation as a difficult place to visit or reside.

Tioga

With a typical family income of over $75,000, Tioga is a small city in northern Williams County with a population of about 1,600. Tioga, which is located next to the Missouri River and along Highway 40, has a violent crime rate of 1894 per 1000 population, which is 145% higher than the national average.

In Tioga, there is a 1 in 4 chance of becoming a victim of a crime, which includes robbery, assault, rape, murder, and auto theft. In addition, the city struggles with substance misuse, inadequate education, unemployment, poverty, and limited possibilities, all of which add to the city’s reputation as a difficult place to visit or live.

Wildrose

Wildrose is a small community in western Williams County with about 100 residents and a typical household income of roughly $46,000. Located next to the Little Missouri River and along Highway 85, Wildrose has a violent crime rate of 1602 per 1000 population, which is 122% more than the national average.

In Wildrose, there is a 1 in 9 chance of becoming a victim of crime, with crimes ranging from arson to robbery, rape, assault, and murder. The town’s negative reputation is further exacerbated by issues including poverty, corruption, poor health, inadequate services, and environmental problems.

In summary

Based on available statistics, the five most dangerous neighborhoods in Williams County are represented by the aforementioned communities. This evaluation does not, however, imply that these communities are hopeless or unredeemable. Many of the workers and inhabitants in these neighborhoods are working to improve their conditions and bring about positive change.

The goals of these projects and programs are to raise living standards, decrease crime, and increase possibilities in these areas. As a result, it’s critical to recognize and encourage these neighborhoods’ efforts and accomplishments while also realizing the risks and problems they confront.

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